Creativity Found: finding creativity later in life

Practising what I preach!

May 16, 2023 Claire Waite Brown Episode 74
Creativity Found: finding creativity later in life
Practising what I preach!
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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers
A printmaking class helps me to get over my fear of 2D.
When Gerry Coles invited me to one of her printmaking workshops my initial reaction was that there was no way I would go because I would be rubbish.
Regular listeners will have heard me saying that that should not be a reason for not trying a new creative activity, so of course I told myself off, and told Gerry I'd love to go.
Find out how I got on, and hear from a few of the other students about their attitudes to getting creative in adulthood.

Find out more about Gerry's workshops here.

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Researched, edited and produced by Claire Waite Brown
Music: Day Trips by Ketsa Undercover / Ketsa Creative Commons License Free Music Archive - Ketsa - Day Trips
Artworks: Emily Portnoi emilyportnoi.co.uk
Photo: Ella Pallet


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Claire Waite Brown:

Now the thing is I have a real problem in my mind with two dimensional art. I just really struggle with translating something that I see or imagine, onto paper with line with shading. It just doesn't seem to translate for me. My first thought was, I can't do that. I'll be rubbish. So had a quick stern word with myself, Claire. That's exactly the kind of thing you encourage listeners not to feel like

Unknown:

the day I started work when I was 21. I'd stopped doing things for myself. Yeah. And I've always been sad about that. But life does happen to you know, jobs, kids, illnesses.

Claire Waite Brown:

Hi, I'm Claire, founder of creativity found a community for creative learners and educators, connecting adults who want to find a creative outlet with the artists and crafters who can help them do so. With workshops, courses, online events and kits. For this podcast, I chat with people who have found or refound their creativity as adults will explore their childhood experiences of the arts, discuss how they came to the artistic practices they now love. And consider the barriers they may have experienced between the two. We'll also explore what it is that people value and gain from their newfound artistic pursuits, and how their creative lives enrich their practical, necessary everyday lives. Hi, listeners, Claire here, it's time for another one of my cheeky bonus episodes. And this time, the episode is about me, practising what I preach and taking a dose of my own medicine. I'll tell you for why. I'm here in the garden of Jerry Coles. Jerry is a printmaker, a friend, a podcast guest, and she's also a creativity found collective member, because she teaches printmaking workshops. Now, when Jerry asked me if I'd like to come to one of her workshops, my first thought was, I can't do that. I'll be rubbish. So had a quick stern word with myself, Claire, that's exactly the kind of thing you encourage listeners not to feel like, it shouldn't matter whether you think you're going to be any good at it. It shouldn't matter if you believe that there are other people in the workshop who will be better than you. It's all about giving it a go seeing if you like it, having a bit of time to do something for yourself. So I changed my mind and said yes, of course, I will come to this workshop. Now the thing is, I have a real problem in my mind with two dimensional art, I just really struggle with translating something that I see or imagine onto paper with line with shading, it just doesn't seem to translate for me. So that's why this this workshop initially sounded a bit scary. I'm not bad at doing crafty three dimensional type things. Once a month on a Monday I go to Kelly drew it creative networking event, you can find out about that on the creativity found website as well. And while we have a chat online, we take part in our own crafty activity. I bought myself a miniature kit on building a miniature library, a miniature library. And I thoroughly enjoy doing that activity. But I only ever do it at the session. I never managed in the weeks in between because it's a monthly session to do that for myself, even though I love doing it. So these kinds of workshops are another way for you to make time to do something creative. Also at creativity found.co.uk. We've got Nancy from createFile, who runs craft and chat events. So that's a time you can put in your diary to go and do something creative and a recent member Becky Willis of Yanni bees. She has her craft hive, again time put aside, whether online or in real life to get together and do some crafting. So that's what I'm doing today. I'm here doing some printmaking putting aside some time to get creative for myself and I'm going to have a little chat with some of the other people on the workshop as well. That was exactly what was said in my intro. And that's what I'm doing. And so I'm here with Kate and Deborah. And they are busy carving, and I'm going to interrupt them in their car thing. But I wanted to know, I was talking in my intro about how it can be difficult for grownups to give themselves the time to do creative activity. So Deborah, is this something that you do a lot, you take the time to get creative. It's not

Unknown:

one rarely because I, I do a creative job. But it's very kind of clinical. Yeah. And I don't do anything for myself. I think that the day I started work when I was 21, I'd stopped doing things for myself. Yeah. And I've always been sad about that. But life does happen to, you know, jobs. Kids. Yeah. illnesses. Yeah. Things like that. Really?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah. So you said you had a creative job? What do you do

Unknown:

on the graphic designer?

Claire Waite Brown:

That often comes up actually, as when people are younger, and they're quite arty at school, is, that seems a way to go for doing the job. Because often like being an artist or doing something artist, you don't think of his job, but graphic design that will lead to being a job did you do graphic design at uni or something in order to go on to that?

Unknown:

I always wanted to be a graphic designer. My father was a commercial illustrator in sort of 1970s and 80s. I had an older brother, who was a graphic designer, so I just sort of kept you know, I was blinded to anything else. Really, it was what I wanted to do. I did go to university, I did do it. I enjoyed that. But I found work was just, it was like chalk and cheese. Yeah, everything you did creatively beforehand, was for yourself. And it was what you wanted to do and your ideas. And then suddenly, you would be told what to do. And it's, it's a bit disheartening, actually. But that's the world of work, and you've got to earn some money at the end of the day. So you just fall into it. So

Claire Waite Brown:

I'll come back to why you've come to this course. Kate, do you do this kind of thing? Often?

Unknown:

Yeah, I do an art class. I do sculpture. I wouldn't have any good at any of it, particularly. But I quite enjoy it. So yeah, I do do a few things. And how did you stop doing those things are retired basically. Gave me the time and actually probably as importantly, the money. Because it's not cheap. Doing lots of courses either, which is I think, also restricted for some people. Definitely. So yeah, so I did. I didn't do really any art from school. Yeah.

Claire Waite Brown:

And did you didn't feel arty at school, did you? Because when you retire, there are lots of things you could do. You could go walking or, you know, why was it artistic activities that you chose to get into?

Unknown:

Because I'm one of those people that have tried most things really? So yeah, I've tried walking, I've tried Nordic walking, I've done all sorts of things. And yeah, it's just one of those things, really. And I think as you get a wee bit older, there's more and more courses during daytime. So there's more opportunity to do things, I think,

Claire Waite Brown:

yeah. Why did you choose to come to Jerry's course today?

Unknown:

I do quite a lot of art with a friend of mine. And we've tried different things. And we thought we tried it.

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah. What about you, Deborah, why did you choose this workshop?

Unknown:

I have done ly no cutting at secondary school. But that was a long time ago for me now. And it's always something I wanted to do again. I remember, I mean, I only did it like once or twice in school. But I just remembered that feeling of peeling the paper off. And that's always stayed with me. So I wanted to do that again. And it's always been in the back of my mind. I will do that one day, we'll do that one. But I saw Jerry's course, I looked on her website. And I just thought, well, it's near me and that's what I'm looking for. And I think I just needed the environment to get me back into it rather than just trying to scratch about by myself at home. Yeah,

Claire Waite Brown:

I mean, Jerry already said didn't cheat, but she tried to keep first time and didn't get on well with it and put it away from me. So it's good to start with an actual work too. and have some guidance, and I think possibly being with other people as well.

Unknown:

Definitely. Yeah, I think absolutely. Yeah. I think he's doing it with other people. Yeah. And also, you can't just if you're on a course, you just can't put it down and watch telly. Yeah. Or do what you would at home, you are encouraged to do more. So it's a good thing. Yeah,

Claire Waite Brown:

I agree. And how are you both feeling about your results so far as you're carving away? Space?

Unknown:

These things take a long, long time to get good at. Yeah, so I don't think I'm a natural expert at this point where I show you this is Jeremy speaking, first line in a cup that I did, and I'm holding up something that's worthy of the Royal Academy. scription It's a cross between the male and the cat sitting on a branch and it looks like an eight year old child who has done it. So I'm pretty impressed. I'm pretty well, yes. He led us to very high. He's he's an interesting looking out. Yes. So, yes, it's

Claire Waite Brown:

really good that you've got it there. Yeah, not long ago. Yeah. And then we're going to look around at all the friends in the room. How do you feel?

Unknown:

How do I feel about what I'm feeling enthusiastic. I really enjoyed the initial exercise, which was kind of just getting you started. But yeah, I think I just need to keep at it. Yeah, keep going. Keep plugging away. Yeah. I have to stop taking a

Claire Waite Brown:

break and talking to people, I don't actually have to do some. Thanks for talking to me. I did manage to complete my carving using the linework. You'll see on the creativity found cover art and branding. As my inspiration. I slipped with my gouge a couple of times, but make the most of those unplanned lines as part of my composition, and even added a few more mistakes in quotation marks. I would say my style is naive, and I decided on a less solid effect for my background that complimented that style, basically making the conscious decision not to press too hard with my Baron and wooden spoon. And if you want to know what all that means, then you'll have to head to a workshop yourself. I would definitely be more open to saying yes to a class that is somewhat out of my wheelhouse in the future, and won't shy away from to d although using a sewing machine might have new thinking twice. To find workshops or courses in all sorts of creative disciplines, heads to creativity found.co.uk. And if you are the teacher of such a class, I'd love for you to join the creativity found collective and benefit from a bit of extra promotion, networking and collaboration opportunities. To find out more and sign up visit creativity found.co.uk/join us. And finally, a very big thank you to Jerry, Kate and Deborah for a wonderful afternoon of printmaking. Thanks so much for listening to creativity found. If your podcast app has the facility, please leave a rating and review to help other people find us on Instagram and Facebook follow at creativity found podcast and on Pinterest look for at creativity found. And finally, don't forget to check out creativity found.co.uk The website connecting adults who wants to find a creative outlet with the artists and crafters who can help them tap into their creativity.

How to make time to do something creative
Why printmaking?
Gerry's first linocut

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