Creativity Found: finding creativity later in life

More Than Work – Claire and Rabiah

October 02, 2022 Claire Waite Brown / Rabiah Coon Episode 60
More Than Work – Claire and Rabiah
Creativity Found: finding creativity later in life
More Info
Creativity Found: finding creativity later in life
More Than Work – Claire and Rabiah
Oct 02, 2022 Episode 60
Claire Waite Brown / Rabiah Coon

Dance, books, drama and singing, and why making this podcast is so important to me.
For this episode I’m speaking with . . . well, actually, for this episode my friend and fellow podcaster Rabiah Coon is speaking with me.
Rabiah’s More Than Work podcast aligns brilliantly with Creativity Found, so please enjoy this episode and head over to More Than Work to find more great listening.
In my own Creativity Found story, I talk about what the Creativity Found podcast means to me, and how it benefits me in so many ways – the social aspect, self-confidence, a sense of independence . . .  and more.
PS I tell my infamous ginger cat story at the end, so stay tuned for that.

If you found value in this episode and would like to show your appreciation, consider supporting the podcast through the Support the Show link, or by sending a boostagram , for example in the Fountain app.

Rabiah at creativityfound.co.uk
CreativityFound.co.uk
Instagram: @creativityfoundpodcast
Facebook: @creativityfoundpodcast and Creativity Found group
YouTube @creativityfoundpodcast
Pinterest: @creativityfound
Twitter: @creativityfoun

Researched, edited and produced by Claire Waite Brown
Music: Day Trips by Ketsa Undercover / Ketsa Creative Commons License Free Music Archive - Ketsa - Day Trips
Artworks: Emily Portnoi emilyportnoi.co.uk
Photo: Ella Pallet

Click here to send a direct message to the show

Click here to book a 1-to-1 online chat with me to understand more about the Creativity Found Collective, the promotional and networking membership for creative small businesses.

Find out more about Kajabi and start your free trial here.

Support the Show.

Support the show here
Subscribe to the Creativity Found mailing list here
Join the Creativity Found Collective here

Creativity Found listener support
Become a supporter of the show!
Starting at $3/month
Support
Show Notes Transcript

Dance, books, drama and singing, and why making this podcast is so important to me.
For this episode I’m speaking with . . . well, actually, for this episode my friend and fellow podcaster Rabiah Coon is speaking with me.
Rabiah’s More Than Work podcast aligns brilliantly with Creativity Found, so please enjoy this episode and head over to More Than Work to find more great listening.
In my own Creativity Found story, I talk about what the Creativity Found podcast means to me, and how it benefits me in so many ways – the social aspect, self-confidence, a sense of independence . . .  and more.
PS I tell my infamous ginger cat story at the end, so stay tuned for that.

If you found value in this episode and would like to show your appreciation, consider supporting the podcast through the Support the Show link, or by sending a boostagram , for example in the Fountain app.

Rabiah at creativityfound.co.uk
CreativityFound.co.uk
Instagram: @creativityfoundpodcast
Facebook: @creativityfoundpodcast and Creativity Found group
YouTube @creativityfoundpodcast
Pinterest: @creativityfound
Twitter: @creativityfoun

Researched, edited and produced by Claire Waite Brown
Music: Day Trips by Ketsa Undercover / Ketsa Creative Commons License Free Music Archive - Ketsa - Day Trips
Artworks: Emily Portnoi emilyportnoi.co.uk
Photo: Ella Pallet

Click here to send a direct message to the show

Click here to book a 1-to-1 online chat with me to understand more about the Creativity Found Collective, the promotional and networking membership for creative small businesses.

Find out more about Kajabi and start your free trial here.

Support the Show.

Support the show here
Subscribe to the Creativity Found mailing list here
Join the Creativity Found Collective here

Claire Waite Brown:

For this episode I'm speaking with well, actually, for this episode, my friend and fellow podcaster Rabbiah Coon is speaking with me. Rabbiah is more than work podcast aligns brilliantly with creativity found. So please enjoy this episode, and head over to more than work to find more great listening. PS, I tell my infamous ginger cat story in so stay tuned for that.

Unknown:

Welcome to more than work the podcast reminding you that your self worth is defined by more than your job title. I'm Rabbiah, an IT project manager, comedian, nonprofit, volunteer and sometimes activist. Every week, I'll chat with a guest about pursuing passions outside of work, or creating meaningful opportunities inside the workplace. As you listen, I hope you'll be inspired to do the same. Here we go. Hey, everyone, this week, my guest is someone I met basically online on an app during lockdown. There were a lot of us in England and elsewhere using clubhouse and it's an app. I'm not using that much anymore, but it's just an audio app. And so I ended up in some creative, like creative person groups. And she was in one of them. And we've gotten to know each other. And she even came to see me do comedy, which was awesome. So it's Claire Waite Brown. She's a podcaster and founder of creativity found how are you doing, Claire?

Claire Waite Brown:

I'm very well. Thank you. How

Unknown:

are you? Good, good. Thanks. So can you just introduce yourself a little bit and tell people where I'm talking to you from? So I'm in London? And where are you? Yeah.

Claire Waite Brown:

Okay, so I'm in Oxford, just outside of Oxford in my little office. And as you mentioned, I've recently started the podcast and developing that now, under the name of creativity found and yeah, that's where I am.

Unknown:

Awesome. Let's just start off with what is creativity found?

Claire Waite Brown:

Basically, I started the podcast, which was born out of something else I was doing that I started later in life and doing that thing, it's basically theatre arts classes. For adults. It's called Open Stage Arts. And the idea was that that was just for the fun of it a bit of singing and a bit of drama without the politics of maybe joining a drum Theatre Company, not having to learn lines, not having to audition just hopefully a bit more relaxed and just for the for the fun of it. And while doing those classes and meeting the people coming to those classes, I started to come across people who was similar to me, and that they were looking to get back a creative, something that they may have heard when they were younger, and that they may have lost while working, bringing up children or whatever the stresses and strains are normality of everyday life. And often creativity can be the first thing that gets pushed to the side because other things are more important. So when we got into lockdown, and I wasn't doing those live classes anymore. Somebody out there, a very wise person said, Oh, you've got lots of stories. She was talking about podcasts. And I had no intention of podcasting at all. And she said all but you've got lots of content. And it was then that this idea clicked that there are people out there who have very different stories about their creative discipline, and how they were able to get back to it as adults. So I had a few friends that I already knew with these kinds of stories. So I started with them. And it's basically grown since then. And I've just met some wonderful people who have all sorts of stories. Sometimes it will be triggers, such as ill health, or burnout or stress, that then make them realise I need to chill out a bit. And I need to give a bit more for myself. Otherwise, it'll be maybe, like, I'm doing this, but I'm just not feeling happy, I'm just not content and then finding that it's this creative thing they want to do. That makes them happy. So that's been absolutely wonderful. So I've been chatting to all these lovely artists, and creatives of all disciplines. And then it occurred to me that it would be lovely to connect the listener, or people in general, with ways that they can do what my guest has done. So maybe workshops, maybe exhibitions, maybe subscription boxes, or, or just books or some way to say, look, here's some ideas that you can try. I'm expanding on the whole creativity found concept by now bringing together facilitators who can put their course because there are loads of wonderful people out there teaching adults to do weaving and making hats, and teaching you to play piano, but in a lovely way that isn't like learning scales and all the scary ways. So creativity found is a kind of community that's going to amalgamate all those sorts of creative pursuits that grownups can do in a safe place and feel, you know, relaxed and happy and calm, because it can be quite scary for grown ups to go and try new things. But hopefully, people can be encouraged by the guests that I speak to on the podcast. And then you know, to give it a go themselves as well.

Unknown:

Yeah, that's cool. And I just had so many thoughts while you were saying all this because I have friends who they have kids and their kids are kind of of school age now. And they're starting to find that they've lost parts of themselves during that process. And you have, you know that as a mom is also right, yeah, yeah. And, and then they go and do creative things. I have one friend who does, and she's the listener. So I am mentioning her but she does like etching, right. And she'll go do a class for that. And she's an Oregon, and she's a great artist. And then I have another friend who's just gone through some stuff in the past year. And he just started drawing, and he forgot that he drew as crazy as it sounds right? You can do something. But he used to draw very long time ago as a kid, and now he's like in his 40s. And he just started drawing, and it's amazing. And so there is that need to find that again,

Claire Waite Brown:

right? Yeah. And like I said earlier, it often gets put on the backburner when other things become more important. And like you say, about children. I mean, my daughter is 20 now and my son is 15. But when they're young, you life is full of probably work and children and family stuff. But also, I tended to have quite a good social circle, then because there were the other parents and you were busy doing things, you're going to toddler groups or school and doing stuff like that. And I found that when my children got older, I lost some of those social connections as well. So starting openstage arts, for example, which if you think of it, it's kind of modelled on the kind of performing arts classes that children can do the Saturday schools. And that's kind of what I wanted to replicate. By doing that I got a whole social life back again, as well. So there's there is that finding something, I mean, I used to dance, I did dance for a degree. And I just got back into really loving doing those exercises, even though I'm not performing in front of an audience while I am, you know, the people in class, but that connection with performance that I've that I've always loved,

Unknown:

even with the dance, then when you think about you were a dancer to the point where you got a degree in it, we're doing performance, and then at some point that stopped. I know when people have those kinds of careers and they stop sometimes you do end up not enjoying it anymore. And so coming back to it that you were able to enjoy it. Can you talk a little bit about like, were you apprehensive and coming back to that at all?

Claire Waite Brown:

No, I think another thing that comes to mind actually is that also people They will completely block it off. If they can't do it, then they don't want anything to do with it at all. So I certainly had one of my guests really enjoyed drama as a child, but it was made apparent to her by her parents, which is another thing parental pressure, societal pressure, that can stop you doing what your heart wants to do. And because she wasn't doing theatre, she completely stopped it. I don't want anything to do with it at all. And then she was quite brave, to come back to trying it again. I mean, for me, it was never not there. It just wasn't there in a big way. So for example, we used to do aerobics classes, and that, you know, that has a bit of fat in it. And I just started to do a few more dancy classes that were fitness dancy classes. And then I went on to, to train to teach a dance fitness class myself. And then having done open Stage Arts, I started to get a bit braver in other things, and I joined a local street dance class. And that got me performing again, in front of an audience that I didn't know. So as a teacher of dance fitness, you are performing, but it's two people, you know, and you're telling them what to do. This being in street dance, which is a completely different style of dance for me. Absolutely loved it, it was really difficult to get started with I have to say my body was just not dancing in that way. And it still doesn't as well as it should. But it's pretty good. And performing in front of audiences again, and for performers, you'll know they get I will assume you'll know Rabea I certainly still get very nervous before Yeah.

Unknown:

Yeah, absolutely. And surprisingly, so sometimes. Are you ever surprised by how nervous you are? Yeah, fine. And all of a sudden, I'm like, What's going on here?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah, I know exactly what I've got to do. And usually, and I know that I love being on stage. And I know that usually when I get in stage, my body takes over. And it's all fine. But yeah, my family, if they come to a performance, they'll laugh at me and say, Oh, she's gonna start going silent now and start, like, you know, pacing around, and I can't have my family talking to me, like, get all this they know what my pre performance kind of body and emotional state is. They just have to leave me alone. But once you step out on the stage and start, absolutely love it, absolutely love it, which is why we keep doing it.

Unknown:

Yeah, no, I agree. That's so funny. Because um, I, I've noticed I don't sometimes have respect for myself, and the way I should that I need this quiet time, or I need it, I sometimes will just shut my eyes quickly, and focus and whatever. But if certain people are there that don't know, then sometimes I just don't even tell them. I just kind of see what happens to myself. But it's not good or bad happens on stage. It's just kind of like, I'm flustered. And yeah, that's where

Claire Waite Brown:

you don't need to be dealing with other people. It's great when people come to see your performance, but I can't be talking to you. Much beforehand. You were very good. You came and spoke to us beforehand. When we came to see you

Unknown:

Yeah, then but that's because it was like date, day four. And I was like just okay, I got this thing. Plus, I did get nervous. Once I got on stage like me all of a sudden, hit me like a tonne of bricks every time. I think one thing that's cool, too, is just thinking about how it's scary to try new things as an adult, because did you interact with people who had never done theatre? I mean, you might have interacted people did do theatre and dance, but then people had never done it. Because, yeah, I know people like that. So how, I guess if you think about those people, was there a certain way of approaching them or

Claire Waite Brown:

it's all it all comes down to the initial way I put the classes across. So in my website, obviously, in all my marketing, I make a very big deal about the fact that it's pressure free, it's fun, it's friendly. There is definitely you see new people coming across the door who who want that challenge, but actually are also really scared because you don't you don't know what to expect. So it comes down to the group and I have some wonderful teachers who completely understand the whole ethos of the group and that if people don't want to do something, they don't do it. If something doesn't quite sit, right, you know, the teachers can tell and react accordingly. But then it's in the group of people as well, like people that have been there for a while. They know what it's like to be there for the first time and they know how new people feel. And but what tends to happen is there's a lot of laughter in our classes and what tends to happen is the first mock up the The first thing that you think you've done wrong, something else I say a lot actually is you can't do anything wrong, there's no wrong, there's just doing something your way, or think differently, which is fine. But the first time somebody does maybe think they've done something wrong, and it's just you just laugh about it, or you just carry on. I mean, you'll know about improv, for example, you know, you just got to keep going with it, and just just go with what you've created. So I've certainly had people say to me, at the end of a class, that was petrifying, but in a good way, and then you can build on that. But certainly, it just comes across with the advertising and the actual atmosphere within the class, that it's a really comfortable and safe environment. And it doing this stuff really isn't as scary as you might think, from the outside. But I do know, people do have a barrier to get through, sometimes I'll have people book but they can't quite make it through the door. So there is a different barrier of taking that first step and challenging yourself. But this is a thing from open Stage Arts that I've taken to creativity found is to try something and don't be afraid if you make a mess of it, you know, I say this a bit. It's not necessarily making a mess of it. It's fine. Give it another go try something different, you know, whatever. Just give it a try.

Unknown:

Yeah, I agree with that. And even one place I face that a lot is like at the gym, I will sign up for class. Like last week I did, I signed up for a class, and then I cancelled like, 24 hours before. So I just was like, I don't want to go in and look like a fool. Yeah, I've also just approached the instructor before and say, Hey, this is my first time. Just so you know. I might not be comfortable. And I feel like when I do that, I feel pretty good. But when I cancel, I feel bad. So I think people Yeah, it's just trying, right?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah. Yeah, I do. I do understand that. And I have a I do have a big fear of the unknown. I think that's what makes me most nervous, is not knowing what's going to happen. But as as a fitness instructor, for example, we are very aware of the people that we're looking at in the class. And while most of us are anyway. There may be some fitness instructors that are more about them than about the class, but most of us are about the class. And most of us know if you're new anyway, depending on the size of the class, but we're there just to make you feel comfortable. And again, with my classes. One of my favourite phrases is or something similar, because we do stairs, and I will teach them and then I say or something similar. And if people go off doing something slightly different, that's absolutely fine.

Unknown:

We are like in yoga, they always had the modified poses. Yeah, yeah. I basically have done modified yoga for sure. I don't know if I've done regular yoga. Modified yoga. So for you, I would say you did something new then with the podcasting and with going out, or, well, we're not really going out with it too much. But so what was that like for you getting started with a podcast? And how did you go about starting your own podcast?

Claire Waite Brown:

Well, I'm i I'm one of those people that gets an idea. And then goes and does it. Even though quite often, I don't know how to go and do it. Many moons ago. I started a panto in the village that I live in. Because the village hall was looking for things to fill it and some of us in the pub invariably came up with the idea of a Panto, and nobody else would have done it. So I did it. I had no idea what I was doing. And six years later, we don't do it now. But we did six or seven years of Great fun pan toes. And the same with openstage Arts didn't know what I was doing. Same with the podcasts. And I just learn as I go along, and try not to worry too much. I tend to do this thing where everything's in my head. And then it jiggles around and it jumbles all about and I'm like, oh, and then I have to organise it, write it down, figure out what I need to do first, and then it sorts itself out. But from a podcast point of view, I had been on a course, just a just an hour, like just a workshop on zoom that I thought was going to be about video editing, which I had recently learned on iMovie because I was doing the fifth steps classes in lockdown. I was doing videos for them. So I went on this workshop thing, and it ended up being actually all about audio editing. And it was this particular podcast platform that I'm not very keen on but I had a listen in it and I thought, hey, I could do this, I found out that that wasn't the right thing for me. So I tried something else blardy blardy blar, learn how to do the audio editing just on GarageBand did a little bit of research, bought a little bit of equipment, not much at all went out there. As I said, I had a few friends already that I knew their stories would fit. So I went and interviewed them put out a message on a Facebook group locally, saying, you know, this is this is what the point of this podcast is. And had someone replied to that went and met her. And they just kind of grew a bit from there got much better at the editing, the first time I edited it took for ever. I mean, it takes quite a long time now. But I took such a long time with it the first time. And the second time, and probably the third time, but it got better each time. So it was just learning as I'm going along, meeting people helps you meet other people clubhouse. As you mentioned earlier, we clubhouse has been amazing for meeting people, especially at the beginning of the year, when we were all still stuck in doors. And I think actually, the whole lockdown business has actually opened me up to more country wide opportunities and meeting nationwide guests, rather than maybe I might have just stuck with Oxford. But I was forced to go online. And that opened lots of doors for me. So I just follow along. And then ideas come to mind. And I follow those.

Unknown:

Yeah, I mean, I know with mine, the quality changed. I got to I got this really horrible microphone that I thought was okay. And then now I have a better one. And that makes a big difference. And then yeah, editing. And I was I'm a GarageBand person also. And now I'm using a different thing for transcripts that have done nothing with yet but I heard which was to have them. So yeah, you know, but I know exactly what you mean, just kind of having to tinker with things and learn and keep going at it in the editing, I haven't found it a way to make it much faster than it is. But I like your editing actually, because you cut in some music in between things and stuff like that. And it's it's cool. So I like it.

Claire Waite Brown:

Thank you. I've been an editor of books for very many years. So I am very particular on that. And I do like editing and organising. And I do enjoy the audio editing process. Because I know that I'm making a really nice product for the listener without the listener knowing of everything that's gone on in between time. And that's what I liked that podcast as well is that it? You make it as best quality as you can. But you don't have to be studio quality and you don't have to go out to studios and spend lots of money and and I'm certainly a fan of the ordinary person doing podcasts. I do personally get a little bit cross about celebrities doing them because I'm like, you've got your platform. You're already on the radio. Leave the podcasts to us. Yeah,

Unknown:

I agree. And it is funny because I don't and guess we'll know. And I don't cut every especially the things I say I leave a lot of my blunders in for sure. But I don't cut every single filler word out because there's no point. That's not how people talk. And I think if you listen to someone who I'm saying, if I'm telling my listeners Oh, I hope you're relating to this person. And then they're so incredibly well spoken that they never have a problem. It doesn't even make any sense. That's so unrelatable Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. So I'm with you. And then yeah, on the subject to have just the ordinary person being a podcaster. Versus, well, the thing with the celebrity podcasts, and I listened to some of them, and some of them I don't, of course, but you end up with the same guests on every single one. So what's cool about our podcast is you don't do that, ya know, neither one of us is going to end up, you know, on Chelsea Handler's podcast at this point, or whatever, which is fine, you know, unless you want to sign I mean, Amazon but

Claire Waite Brown:

creativity found.co.uk is the place to go to find workshops, courses, supplies, kits and books to help you get creative. So if you're looking for your own creativity found experience, go have a browse to see what's on offer so far. And if you can help adults to find their new creative passion, please get in touch on social media, or through the contact details on the website.

Unknown:

So for you, other than or maybe we've already talked about it, but just what do you find the most rewarding about the medium of podcasting for you? What's been the most rewarding thing?

Claire Waite Brown:

It has been and This, this probably could have happened another way with something else. But it has been the meeting people and the ability to meet people and to hear their stories. And all of my guests obviously have have a challenge that they've had to overcome in order to get to back to their creativity. And it's always a positive story, because obviously, I'm speaking to them, because they have got to that bit of creativity, but it's also understanding the very similar themes that keep coming up, whether that'd be about education, or I thought I was rubbish, or somebody told me, I should do it and made me not want to do it. And I now come across a few similar themes as we're going along. So I just find it really interesting. It's all down to the meeting people and, and the guests, and also learning about their art forms as well, because I love to see, I don't consider myself, this is something I was talking about on another podcast, because I'm like, I don't consider myself to be a creative, because what is a creative Is it someone that creates something, is it someone that paints a picture, or puts on a show, in some ways it is, in other ways, it's a way that you find to do something, whether that be overcome a problem, or just make some food or, or just get everything out of yourself, so, but I do like to learn about how other people are doing it, and even how it has come to them. Because for some people, it's come from somewhere completely unexpected. Like they've got some acrylic paint, and it's just, they've always painted. This was far for example, she had when she was younger, painted representational. And then when she was in India, she bought some italic acrylic paints. And out came these abstracts, and she had no idea where that came from. So it's those artistic outpourings that also, you know, really interest me and I get to look at someone to fill up. Yeah, but crafting so it is creating, because you're crafting, then this end product that somebody's going to enjoy listening to. So that is extremely satisfying.

Unknown:

Actually, that is so funny, because that's where I wanted you to get. Oh, not with that sentence. But I was thinking about telling you even after I was actually thinking oh, after I'm gonna mention, yeah, you are a creator. But anyway, you got Yeah. Thanks. These mind tricks are working. I'll teach you.

Claire Waite Brown:

My revelation.

Unknown:

That's what we're about, we'll have an epiphany series. So for you, so you mentioned that your professional careers but in editing, but then you've maintained like with open Stage Arts and creativity found where you're really promoting others creativity, and now we realised creating your own thing. So what impact has once you found it open Stage Arts? And then now doing this? What impact has that had on your life? Would you say and maybe even your overall happiness or your family or anything? Because you have your day job still, but you're doing this?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah, I think it's given me when I say confidence, I don't mean confidence. I mean, it's given me something of my own. And that is actually where openstage Arts came from, as well, because I realised I didn't have something of my own. That was that was for enjoyment. I didn't have something that I was doing just for me for enjoyment. And then I didn't find it. So I ended up starting openstage Arts, which is now a business. So it's not quite just for me for my enjoyment. But these projects, so to speak, on my own. And once again, let me give another epiphany, they are my own creations. So by confidence, I mean, I have something that is all mine that I've created, that I'm sustaining with work. And children in a way you are doing it for another end, and I loved my editing my editing. I wanted to do like high literature fiction, and I ended up falling into illustrated nonfiction, which I absolutely love. And in fact, I do know a lot now about what some of my guests do, because I've edited a lot of craft and art books, and there's a creativity in those books that I wouldn't have got if I'd been doing the fiction. I don't think I would have enjoyed it. I think I would have found it very boring. So I've loved that. But it was for someone else, where I used to have a very strict framework of the children go to school, so I work, then I'll take them swimming or do whatever we have to do. That is less. So now children are much older have a lot of their own things to do don't need me doing that. I do take them to museums, and they get crossed with me. But you have to do that errand. I have another framework. Now that is, that is all about me and not about other people. Well, it is about other people. But it gives me a satisfaction that I've created it. I've invented it, so to speak. And now I'm making it happen.

Unknown:

I think one thing people do is they judge themselves all the time. And so they might think, just I'm thinking about a few friends in particular, but and even myself sometimes, but yeah, you are kind of setting your own path. And you're not like beholden to other people necessarily, or if you aren't your choice. I mean, I think I'm not a parent. But I think parents as as wonderful as being a parent is, I think also has to be really hard because you guys don't get a day off. I mean, you just don't you know? And if you do it means you've arranged for someone to do something and then you're owing them and I don't know, seems like a lot. I mean, I have plants and that, you know, I'm even worried about when I leave to go visit home. What am I gonna do with these plants? I don't know what I do with kids.

Claire Waite Brown:

Just leave them with a drip feed of water. Oh, yeah,

Unknown:

I was gonna look into it. Yeah, see right of me. So I'm curious too about dance. I think it's so cool. I almost put stick it oh, I should try that. And I pictured myself falling. But what dance were you trained in? What type of dance?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah, contemporary dance, which wasn't my thing either. So I wanted to be all jazz hands. And I wanted to do show like musical theatre type stuff. And I would have been happy in a chorus I had no, you know, I didn't want to be a main player. I just wanted to dance. And I did dance in Amsterdam. While I was doing my GCSEs and my A levels. I was still doing that. And I just thoroughly enjoyed that performance. So I would have liked to have gone to one of those jazz hands type Theatre Arts dance schools, but my mom was having none of that. So the compromise was that I had to do a degree. So I did a degree in dance. And at that time, there were only I think there are only about three unis that were doing dance degrees, and they were all contemporary. And I had a great time at my university, and I did enjoy the dance. It was a lot of choreography. And you were all meant to be new and finding new ways of moving and new ways of expression. That just won't be the old ways of dancing. So I did thoroughly enjoy that. But it wasn't where I wanted to go. And I think that is what then made me change course. And I can actually remember being in this part of uni where you used to have to go to get your mail from the pigeonholes. For some reason I was sitting there. And as I know, I'm not good enough at dance to make a career of it. So I'll choose My next favourite thing, which is books. So I made a career in publishing by just sending my CVS out and just getting whatever job was offered me. And I did a bit of contemporary dance in London, the place on the side, and then that just kind of fizzled out. And it wasn't a conscious decision. It just kind of fizzled out because I was working and we were going out and enjoying ourselves and and blardy blar. So when I started again, I was doing aerobics classes. It we've moved on from aerobics then it was like body conditioning and things. So it wasn't that long ago, about seven, eight years ago. And I was doing some of these classes. I was thinking all I could train in this and I could teach these kinds of classes. Yeah. So I went and did my exercise to music qualification, which was fabulous. I think I was in my early 40s At that stage. So myself and one other lady, we were of that age. Everybody else was a lot younger during that course, but had an most wonderful time. So I got that qualification. And then very soon after this opportunity came up to train in a particular dance fitness programme called Fit steps, which is based on the Latin American and ballroom dances. It's all Strictly Come Dancing time. So this is strictly come down to me super popular, and this thing came up so I've never done that kind of dance before either. But it's really suits me and it's really enjoyable. And that helped me I think, to try some other dance classes and stuff and eventually do the do the street dance that I do now as well.

Unknown:

Yeah Wow, that's so cool. Awesome. Thanks for telling me about that. Cuz I really like I don't know, the street dancing. I kind of want to see that now it sounds sounds really cool. So do you have we've shared a lot we've had some epiphanies. But do you have any advice or mantra that you want to share that you'd like to just that maybe you refer to or that you'd like to share with others?

Claire Waite Brown:

Well, only of what we've already touched on, actually, is to try it. Even if you're scared that you might make a mess of it. It's not, you know, it's not brain surgery, not going to kill anyone, if you want to go do a watercolour course. Or you want to try pottery? What's the worst that can happen? It might look a mess. It might look like a monster, but you're not gonna have killed it.

Unknown:

That's, that's true. And that's a good. That's a good litmus test for if you should try something. Will you kill anyone? No, then try it. Yeah, I like it. No, that's giving yourself permission. Right. Awesome. So I have a set of questions called the fun five that I ask every guest. So we'll get into those. So the first one, what's the oldest t shirt you have and still wear.

Claire Waite Brown:

Okay, so I'm gonna be a difficult guest. And I get a slightly change that, too, I want to tell you about a denim jacket. Perfect. I have this denim jacket. And it's probably about 2019 years old, because I remember buying it when Sydney was a baby. And I bought it from French Connection, as the only thing I could possibly ever wear from French Connection, but for some reason, I was able to wear that. And it's and I still wear it now. But the reason I wanted to tell you about it, excuse me if I laugh, and nobody else laughed at this story. But I have a story. So a couple of years ago, we were at Disney World. And they have these. We call them badges. They call them pins, obviously. They're different words. They have these lovely metal pins of all the Disney characters. And my daughter and I were at one of these concessions looking at these pins. And I was saying to well, they're lovely, but I don't know what I do with them. And this lady next to me, she's turned around she said she said have you got a ginger cat in the split moment when someone talks you you've got to answer I was like, well actually I do have a cheat. Me I do. So I said she said put the pins on. What again, a very good reason. jean jacket while I did buy two of these pins, I have figured Winnie the Pooh and I have the 101 Dalmatians and they are on this denim jacket that I still wear to this day. Call this denim jacket. My ginger cat.

Unknown:

That's great, because it's so ridiculous. But I know I know. And we do use different words there for sure. So I've got a jean jacket but I just thinking like this pin cushion cat you have now too but like, the thing is, so I wear jeans, most of the time, that's my choice, but or my choice of attire. It's not like it's my choice. Someone's forcing some other kind of trousers on me but the thing is, that throws me off here is the word pants, right? Because I would just say I've gotta change my pants. And then that'll some I gotta change my underwear. It's like What's up with her?

Claire Waite Brown:

accident

Unknown:

so I know we use different words in the states and so I'm always like careful like my denim trousers. I call them sometimes it's super awkward

Claire Waite Brown:

that's just weird.

Unknown:

Weird jeans because I didn't know because people say denim and I don't know what to call them so All right. That was a good I'm sure got a laugh.

Claire Waite Brown:

I still laugh about it if

Unknown:

you laughed, let us know you'll be following creativity found and me so let us know. All right, if every day was really Groundhog's Day, I mean now it's not as much so as it was but still a little bit. What song would you have your alarm clock set to play every morning? Yeah, I

Claire Waite Brown:

like this so I'm going with the weekend blinding light because it doesn't get old. I I think it's the best song ever. And I never tire of hearing it. So I wouldn't say like that's my favourite song because I have favourite songs that are from my past and you know remind me of something but that I think I could listen to that song every single day and not get tired of it. And it just makes me so happy.

Unknown:

Yeah, and I mean, I'm already thinking of it like, it's good. Yeah. Okay, that's cool. All right, so coffee or tea or neither?

Claire Waite Brown:

Well, Rabea

Unknown:

I think I know that. I'm having to guess with you spilling it, but yes,

Claire Waite Brown:

definitely tea. And your other part in the show. I was I was compelled to speak out because she was complaining about a she's in other America that she was complaining in the show about tea and I was like, I'm not having that day to complain about tea. Yes, I am tea through and through. I drink so many cups of tea a day. I don't have milk. I now tend to have green tea. I did have decaf black tea. Yeah, I started having decaf when had anxiety and it started giving me heebie jeebies. So I've been decaf ever since. But yeah, tea all the way and I won't hear a bad word said about it.

Unknown:

I like to. That's pretty clear. Cool. And, okay, so this, we might have gotten into this already. But like, can you think of a time you like laugh so hard? You cried or just couldn't stop? Whether it's the last time you did that or anytime?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah. Recently, actually, we were on holiday in Kent. And the four of us were at dinner. And we started playing it was Charlie's idea. Because this is something else I've bought from openstage Arts is making us play drama games at the table. So we started playing, who am I? You know, we have to do yes, no answers. And we ended up just in hilarity and I cannot remember exactly which comments made us laugh so much. But the waitress in the restaurant was quite amused by the whole table laughing out loud. And there was another incident. But this is really mean, I don't know why I found it so funny. But it was watching that show on TV, which I always you've been framed? I always want to call it Whose Line Is It Anyway? Obviously it isn't. And there was a girl. She was issuing herself. She was sitting down. And for some reason, she's just kind of silly. And it was her for some reason, Charlie, and I just got in a right giggle loop on that. And we just could not get out of that. Bit mean, ya

Unknown:

know, there was a guest that said little kids falling is what leave for. But in that case? Yeah, no, that's okay. i It's not meant to be a nice question. It's just a, it's just a question, you know. And the last one who inspires you right now?

Claire Waite Brown:

Okay, well, this is probably gonna sound a bit sycophantic and cheesy, but all of my guests, I mean, they are the ones that have inspired me to keep going with the podcast, their stories inspire me, every new guests that I meet, the challenges that they faced, and God over is inspirational for me. And obviously, I hope it's gonna be inspirational and encouraging for everybody that listens as well.

Unknown:

Cool. I agree. I, that happens with me too. And then is there anything you want to promote? Or any where you want people to go to find you? I'll link to your Instagram, for example. But do you just want to tell people where to look for you?

Claire Waite Brown:

Yeah, do have a look at basically its creativity. found.co.uk I'm building it up right now, I really will see that something else I've had to learn is building the website and how to systematically make that work well, which is another kind of editorial thing to make it really easy for people to use. But anyway, that aside, do have a look at that, because I'm gradually building up and adding more people to it. So have a look. You can find the podcast episodes there. You can find some art, some of my guests there, some of the artists, some of their exhibitions and some of the workshops that are on offer. So I would say all you need to know is creativity found.

Unknown:

Awesome. Cool. Well, Claire, this has been a lot of fun. Thank you so much for being yeah, thanks so much.

Claire Waite Brown:

Oh, you're welcome. Thank you.

Unknown:

Thanks again for listening this week. You can find out more about the guests in the show notes and Robbia said.com. Joe mafia created the music just for this podcast. Find him on Spotify. That's Joe MAFF IA and Rob Beck. He is responsible for our visual design. You can find him online by searching for Rob met ke Thanks, Rob. Let me know who you'd like to hear from or about your own experiences defining yourself outside of work. Follow up more than work pod or some message on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn or visit our website more than work pod.com Give us a follow on Spotify, Apple or wherever you get your podcast and leave a review if you like. Thanks for listening to more than worth, while being kind to others. Don't forget to be kind to yourself

Podcasts we love